Content Library

Browse our document library below. Enter search terms to filter results.

Search the Library

Multifamily Energy and Water Management Toolkit

The following toolkit is intended to help improve energy and water management and reduce costs, spending and environmental impacts over the long‐term, while helping to preserve affordable properties. The toolkit is designed to be used by organizations with different levels of experience and capacity in the area of energy and water management. Tools can be downloaded and used sequentially to launch or relaunch across-the-board energy and water management efforts, or can be selected and used individually to assist with specific initiatives already underway. The toolkit is intended to complement other available resources and includes references to other related tools following the table of contents introduction. The tools are grouped into four areas: Portfolio Energy and Water Strategy, Operations and Maintenance, Utility Tracking and Energy and Water Initiatives.
Benchmarking Incentives O&M Portfolio Upgrade Property Management Utility Incentives & Programs Water

Valuing the Financial Benefits of Energy Efficiency in the Multifamily Sector

This paper focuses on how efficiency upgrades affect the financial performance of multifamily buildings. It also provides a replicable methodology for similar research to be carried out on Elevate Energy’s growing portfolio as well as other multifamily buildings nation-wide. Increasing the energy efficiency of multifamily buildings not only helps owners improve building operation, but also provides a lending opportunity for financial institutions. Energy efficiency program implementers and policy makers who aid in shaping utility Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standards also benefit from understanding the full range of positive effects associated with multifamily energy efficiency improvements. These non-energy benefits (NEBs) can range from improved health to job creation and lower greenhouse gas emissions. In this study, we analyzed the financial benefits of energy efficiency upgrades in multifamily buildings. We also examined building owners’ motivations for investing in energy efficiency. We looked at a group of thirteen buildings upgraded through the Elevate Energy efficient buildings program, formerly known as Energy Savers, and compared them to twenty-one buildings that underwent an energy assessment, but did not complete an upgrade. We also interviewed five building owners who completed upgrades through the program. Interviews focused on learning more about their motivations for investing in their buildings and the financial outcomes they perceive. All of the buildings in this study have naturally occurring affordable rents in low-income neighborhoods. Based on the quantitative analysis of pre- and post-upgrade data, buildings that completed an upgrade experienced a 1.6% median increase in net operating income ($29.10 per unit), a $0.12 per square foot decrease in gas costs, and a $0.34 per square foot increase in rental income six months to a year after the upgrade. In the interviews, building owners emphasized the impact of turnover costs and associated lost rental income on the success of a building. They also discussed the importance of keeping rent affordable to maintain a core group of stable, happy tenants. Overall, our results highlight the financial benefits of energy efficiency upgrades among owners who choose to complete the improvements. The paper concludes with specific recommendations for lending entities, energy efficiency programs, and building owners.
Benchmarking Database Finance Retrofit
application/pdf
1.1MB

2014 City of Chicago Building Energy Benchmarking Report

As an economic hub, a global destination, a great place to live, and a leader on environmental sustainability, Chicago is defining what it means to be a world-class city. Chicago’s 500,000 buildings are vibrant connections to the city’s history, and these buildings house the activities that are carrying Chicago forward into the 21st century. The energy used by buildings powers Chicago’s economy and profoundly impacts the natural environment. By raising energy performance awareness and transparency, Chicago’s Building Energy Use Benchmarking Ordinance unlocks information to help accelerate efforts to save energy and strengthen the economy. The ordinance delivers on ambitious energy priorities outlined in Sustainable Chicago 2015, Mayor Emanuel’s three-year action agenda to make our city more livable, competitive, and sustainable. In 2014, the initial phase of Chicago Energy Benchmarking required municipal and commercial buildings larger than 250,000 square feet to track whole-building energy use, verify data accuracy, and report to the City. The policy is creating a foundation of information for efforts to unlock significant energy savings, and phased implementation through 2016 will include commercial, municipal, and residential buildings larger than 50,000 square feet.
Benchmarking

Making Your Mark

Most operational tasks at multifamily communities strive to maximize efficiency in order to increase the bottom line. The web-based revolution in the past 10 to 15 years has helped these businesses to streamline their operations and as that technology evolves, companies are taking a closer look at, and improving, the ways they are spending money on property utilities through benchmarking.
Benchmarking

Making Your Mark

Most operational tasks at multifamily communities strive to maximize efficiency in order to increase the bottom line. The web-based revolution in the past 10 to 15 years has helped these businesses to streamline their operations and as that technology evolves, companies are taking a closer look at, and improving, the ways they are spending money on property utilities through benchmarking. So what is benchmarking? Putting it simply, benchmarking is the process of taking an entity’s specific set of metrics and measuring or comparing those metrics to the metrics of another entity or the average of metrics of other similar entities. In multifamily—and commercial and industrial buildings as well—an example would be taking the total use of electricity at one building and comparing that usage against other similar buildings, or the average usage of multiple buildings that are similar in stature.
Benchmarking

New York City Local Law 84 Benchmarking Report

New York City has released its third annual Local Law 84 Benchmarking Report. The new report analyzes a trove of building energy use data from 2012, collected from more than 23,000 buildings representing more than 2.1 billion square feet of space. It shows an increasing number of building owners are consistently reporting their energy and water use to the city and that the data collected is allowing the city to identify construction types and systems characteristics to better direct policies and programs toward the greatest energy efficiency opportunities.
Benchmarking

Show Me the [Efficiency] Money

Five real estate executives weigh in on what it will take to unlock $1.4 trillion in net energy savings through commercial building efficiency.
Benchmarking Lighting Resident Engagement Retro-Commission Retrofit

Benchmarking Disclosures – What action is needed now by Multifamily Owners?

Understanding the different ordinances – it can be a jungle out there! There is no National Legislation that requires consistent compliance. Cities and States are driving this issue independently. So the answer is: it depends on where the property is located.
Benchmarking Regulations

Another roadblock to Energy Management in Multifamily – The availability of “Whole Building” utility data

Benchmarking the energy performance of a property—that is, measuring it and comparing it to similar properties—requires utility data on energy consumption and load over at least 24 contiguous months . Owners and operators of multifamily properties must have access to this utility data for the whole building in order to benchmark it accurately. However, whole-building energy data is often difficult for them to obtain.
Benchmarking Submetering Utility Incentives & Programs